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History of the Liszt Society (5) The   name   of   Ferenc   Liszt   has   long   been   held   in   traditional   respect   in   Hungary,   and   the   composer's   name   has   been   taken   by   circles   other than   the   Liszt   societies.   As   mentioned   in   A   Magyar   Muzsika   Könyve   (The   Book   of   Hungarian   Music),   a   Ferenc   Liszt   Singing   Circle   was operating   in   Sopron   in   l920-1922. A   Ferenc   Liszt   Circle   was   formed   at   Baja   in   the   summer   of   1926,   and   in   1929   it   opened   a   music   school.   It also organized a 42-member Philharmonic Orchestra. A   Music   Society   was   formed   in   Sopron   as   early   as   in   1829,   and   in   its   centenary   year   in   1929,   it   took   Ferenc   Liszt's   name.   In   recent   decades the name has been transferred to the city's arts centre. For   the   sake   of   completeness   it   should   be   mentioned   that   the Academy   of   Music   has   been   using   Liszt's   name   only   since   1925.   In   1966   and 1907,   the   Ferenc   Liszt   Academy   of   Music   established   three-year   teachers'   training   colleges   under   the   same   name   in   the   major   cities   of Hungary: Budapest, Debrecen, Győr, Miskolc, Pécs and Szeged. State   music   schools   named   after   Liszt   function   in   Budapest,   Baja,   Győr,   Kaposvár,   Szeged   and   Szekszárd.   The   Girls'   Choir   of   the   Gizella ßerzeviczy   Specialized   Secondary   School   of   Economics   took   on   the   composer's   name   in   1979.   The   Ferenc   Liszt   Chamber   Orchestra (founded in 1963) is well known all over the world. After   the   reorganization   of   the   society   in   1973,   a   succession   of   local   groups   were   quickly   set   up.   The   Budapest   choir   and   Sopron   group were   formed   in   the   first   year,   and   the   Youth   Group   of   the   Ferenc   Liszt Academy   of   Music   in   1975.   In   1976   the   cities   of   Pécs   and   Szekszárd followed   suit,   and   in   1980   groups   at   the   Semmelweis   Medical   University   and   the   Ferenc   Liszt   Group   of   Health   Workers   were   formed. A   local group has also been active in Kalocsa since 1982. As   mentioned   already,   one   justification   for   re-forming   the   Hungarian   Liszt   Society   referred   to   by   the   organizers   was   the   existence   of   similar societies   active   abroad,   and   that   it   would   be   only   proper   to   have   one   in   Hungary   as   well.   Ever   since,   the   Liszt   Society   has   assisted   newly established   societies   with   its   advice   and   experience   and   maintained   running   contacts   with   its   counterparts   all   over   Europe,   in   North   and South America, Japan and Australia. Having   looked   at   what   the   Society   has   done   towards   the   objectives   laid   down   in   its   statutes,   let   us   now   turn   to   the   members,   whose   tasks, again according to the statutes, are these: All   members   of   the   Society   are   obliged,   according   to   the   objectives   laid   down   in   the   Statutes,   to   display   a   worthy   activities   through   their work,   and   social   and   moral   attitude. They   are   bound   to   take   an   active   part   in   the   work   of   the   Society,   tocarry   out   the   tasks   entrusted   to   them and undertaken by them, and since finance is the vehicle of intellectual values, to pay membership fees regularly. (In terms of the financial position of the members, this membership fee is practically nominal.) All   this   should   be   performed   in   the   spirit   of   the   idea   that   Liszt   took   over   from   Széchenyi:   "A   pure   spirit,   a   pure   intent,   whether   there   is success   or   not."   The   society   issues   annual   memorial   plaques   for   achievements   in   further   popularizing   Liszt   (to   both   Hungarians   and foreigners). The plaque was designed by the sculptor Miklós Borsos (1906--1990). "Have   you   a   word   for   the   ailing   land?"   The   answer   provided   by   history   to   this   question   quoted   at   the   beginning   of   the   account   of   the   re- establishment of the society in 1973 is YES. With   his   artistic   fame   steadily   increasing   Liszt   after   1840   bore   voluntarily   and   conscientiously   the   character   of   a   Hungarian,   which   involved many   sacrifices.   He   put   great   effort   into   creating   a   cultivated   musical   scene   in   Hungary,   acting   as   a   selfless   champion   of   the   cause   of   his fellow   musicians   and   offering   huge   amounts   for   charitable   purposes   to   the   poor,   orphans   and   flood   victims. Though   a   professed   Catholic,   he showed   a   self-evident   tolerance   towards   all   forms   of   outlook.   He   was   a   stranger   to   all   kinds   of   narrow-minded   enmity   or   jealousy   on   a national,   religious   or   social   basis.   Indeed,   he   considered   generosity   and   chivalry   to   be   typical   Hungarian   national   characteristics.   He professed   himself   a   Hungarian,   but   he   never   tired   of   warning   his   compatriots   that   they   must   attain   a   European   standard   of   cultivation   and become acquainted with the language, music and other cultural forms (literature, etc.) of other peoples. In   our   age,   so   lacking   in   ideals,   it   would   be   hard   to   find   a   more   inspiring   and   exemplary   paragon.   Liszt   if   anyone   was   the   true   embodiment   of the   concept   of   a   Europe   without   borders,   inhabited   by   free   and   equal   peoples.   The   society   would   like   to   work   in   this   spirit   -   in   a   sovereign, free   and   democratic   country.   It   wishes   to   popularize   the   personality,   principles   and   art   of   Liszt   in   the   broadest   possible   field,   in   Hungary   and also   in   the   outside   world   by   forging   closer   relations   with   fraternal   societies   and   encouraging   the   establishment   of   such   societies   in   places where there are none functioning so far. Representatives   of   some   of   the   fraternal   societies   met   in   Budapest   in   the   Liszt   year   of   1986. To   mark   its   centenary   in   1993,   the   Ferenc   Liszt Society   has   invited   representatives   of   all   the   societies   in   the   world   to   an   international   conference,   entitled,   after   an   article   by   Béla   Bartók   in 1911, "Ferenc Liszt and Today's Public". It is hoped that the conference will provide an opportunity for establishing an International Association of Liszt Societies. Plans   for   the   jubilee   include   the   release   of   a   limited-distribution   CD,   containing   a   selection   of   the   prize-winning   recordings   from   the   past   15 years. The society's targets also include a rejuvenation of its membership and encouragement of the establishment of new local groups. All   this   work   was   already   awaiting   the   new   general   secretary   who   took   over   the   post   from   Professor   Forrai   in   1992,   but   who   hopes   to   profit from his advice for many years to come. By   June   1992   the   society   had   a   membership   of   867.   Its   only   fixed   income   comes   from   membership   fees,   and   so   it   must   look   for   sponsors   in order   to   function.   It   wishes   to   take   this   opportunity   to   express   gratitude   for   the   sums   it   has   so   far   received   as   subsidies   from   the   Ministry   of Culture,   the András   Fáy   Fund   of   the   National   Savings   Bank,   the   Post   Office   Bank,   the   City   of   Budapest   and   the   Táncsics   Foundation.   The Academy of Music has provided the society with premises, heating, electricity and cleaning, which it all receives free of charge. These,   then,   are   the   past,   the   present,   and   the   future   plans   of   the   Ferenc   Liszt   Society.   It   awaits   the   cooperation   of   its   tried   members,   and   it also   expects   to   gain   new   members   who   wish   to   serve   mankind   as   a   whole   and   the   little   country   of   Hungary,   in   the   spirit   of   the   composer.   In this   way   the   centenary   celebrations   in   1993   and   the   daily   routine   to   come   should   induce   many   people   to   realize   the   message   in   the   lines Mihály Vörösmarty wrote to Liszt: ... In passion pure awakened then, May deeds in our great sons mature, And weak or strong, may ardent men Unite to act and to endure. The officers of the "FERENC LISZT SOCIETY 1893" in 1992: Honorary President: Georges Cziffra President: Béla Bartók Jr Co-Presidents: Dr László Eősze, Miklós Forrai General Secretary: Dr Klára Hamburger Members of the Presidency: Mária Eckhardt, Dr János Fábián, István Gábor, Dr Dezső Legány, László Lukin, Dr Miklós Marschall, Mrs Puskásné Franciska Ispán, Dr Endre Úry Office Staff: Rózsa Somfai, Dániel Ujváry HEADS OF THE LOCAL HUNGARIAN GROUPS OF THE SOCIETY Szekszárd: Rezső Husek Pécs: Judit Csery Kalocsa: Ferenc Fuchs Sopron: Alpár Nagy
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