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History of the Liszt Society (4) All   the   records   submitted   for   the   competition   each   year,   which   have   recently   included   CDs   and   even   video   cassettes   and   laser   discs,   can   be heard   in   a   special   section   of   the   Record Archives   in   the   old Academy   of   Music   called   the   "Ferenc   Liszt   Record Archives",   which   is   open   to the public. In   recent   years   the   society   has   assisted   in   the   running   of   various   music   competitions,   for   instance   the   National   Piano   Competition   for   Music Teachers and the International Liszt Meeting of Young Pianists. The   aims   of   the   society   include   the   collection   and   publication   of   the   writings   and   letters   of   Liszt.   It   is   hoped   that   this   objective   will   become feasible   too   once   the   economic   conditions   have   improved. The   collection   and   preservation   of   the   Liszt   manuscripts   in   Hungary   has   been   the task   of   the   Ferenc   Liszt   Research   Centre   and   Museum,   an   independent   institution,   set   up   in   1986,   which   is   also   responsible   for   the   care and   expansion   of   the   Liszt   collection   belonging   to   the Academy   of   Music. After   a   long   campaign   over   many   years,   the   old Academy   of   Music building   in Andrássy   út   (where   the   composer   lived   and   his   students   performed)   was   returned   to   the Academy   of   Music   in   1986,   the   year   of the   double   Liszt   anniversary.   This   building   now   houses   the   Liszt   Library   and   Record Archives,   a   Research   Centre   and   the   Liszt   Museum   in the   composer's   former   apartment.   It   is   also   the   headquarters   of   the   Ferenc   Liszt   Society.   The   various   institutions   cooperate   with   each   other in the spirit of Liszt. The   Ferenc   Liszt   Society   considers   its   main   task   to   be   to   acquaint   the   general   public   with   the   composer's   life's   work,   personality   and   life, and   it   therefore   invites   noted   Hungarian   experts   to   hold   lectures   once   a   month   at   club   meetings   entitled   "Visit   to   Liszt".   The   lectures   are illustrated with live music, usually played by students of the Academy. "Locomotion belongs to his diet", Hans von Bülow said of Liszt. The   Ferenc   Liszt   Society   follows   the   Master   in   this   regard   as   well.   Ever   since   its   formation,   among   its   popular   programmes   have   been   the annual   conducted   tours   entitled   "In   the   Footsteps   of   Liszt".   Those   on   the   tour,   who   might   well   be   called   pilgrims,   visit   places   in   Hungary   and abroad   where   Liszt   lived,   worked   or   performed,   and   erect   memorial   tablets   or   lay   wreaths   on   existing   ones   in   tribute   to   his   memory.   During the   years   of   the   communist   dictatorship,   a   special   attraction   of   these   cheerful   tours   was   that   they   allowed   people   to   make   an   extra   visit   to the West (which was normally possible only once in three years). Since 1974, the Ferenc Liszt Society has run tours to the following places. Outside   Hungary:   1973:   Doborján   (Raiding).   1974:   Weimar.   1975:   Presburg   (Bratislava),   Rozsnyó   (Roznava)   and   Cracow,   1976:   Bayreuth. 1977:   Raiding,   Eisenstadt   (Kismarton),   Vienna,   Leningrad.   197&   Rome,   Tivoli:   Villa   d'Este.   1979:   Paris,   Senlis:   a   visit   to   Georges   Cziffra. 1980:   Leipzig,   Erfurt,   Halle,   Weimar,   Dresden,   Jena.   1981:   London.   1982:   Prague,   Opava   (Troppau),   Hradec   (Königgrätz:   in   the   park   of   the former    county    seat    of    Prince    Lichnowsky    the    pilgrims    found    a    Liszt    memorial    stone    which    had    been    thought    lost),    Krzyzanowice, Olomouc,Brno,   Presburg.   1983:   Kolozsvár   (Cluj),   Nagyszeben   (Sibiu),   Marosvásárhely   (Tirgu   Mures),   Csíkszereda   (Miercurea-Cic),   Brassó (Brasov), Arad.   1984:   Zagreb, Trieste,   Maribor,   Vildus   (Schloss   Wildhaus).   1985:   Sopron,   Krems   (the   house   where   Liszt's   mother   was   born), Salzburg,   Kufstein,   Innsbruck,   Maria   Zell,   Vienna,   Raiding.   1987:   Istanbul.   1989:   Lucerne,   Schaffhausen,   Einsiedeln,   Geneva,   Righi,   SL Gallen.   1990:   Sopron,   Raiding,   Uberwart   (Felsőőr),   Unterwart   (Alsóőr),   Forchtenstein   (Fraknó   castle),   Einsenstadt,   Rohrau   (the   house where   Haydn   was   born),   Presburg.   1992:   Lienz,   Cortina   d'Ampezzo,   Sirmione,   Milan,   Como,   Bellagio,   Verona,   Padua,   Venice,   Tarvisio.   In Hungary:   1974:   Budapest.   1975:   Szekszárd.   1976:   Sopron,   Kőszeg,   Mecseknádasd,   Szekszárd.   1978:   Esztergom.   1979:   Kalocsa.   1985: Budapest.   1986:   Baja,   Kalocsa,   Mohács,   Pécs,   Szekszárd.   1988:   Debrecen,   Hajdúszoboszló,   Hosszúpályi,   Tetétlen,   1991:   Baja,   Kalocsa, Szekszárd. 1992: Esztergom, Kalocsa. The   society's   tourists   have   unveiled   new   memorial   tablets   in   Hungary   as   well.   In   1975   they   did   so   in   Sopron,   at   the   site   where   Liszt   gave   his domestic   concerts   (Templom   utca   6).   In   1988   they   placed   one   on   the   wall   of   the   former   palace   of   Liszt's   most   faithful   friend Antal Augusz   in the   Castle   District   of   Budapest,   where   the   tablet   relates   that   "in   this   house   he   often   entertained   the   composer   Ferenc   Liszt".   In   1989   they unveiled   a   tablet   at   the   Hermina   Memorial   Chapel   in   Budapest's   14th   District:   'This   chapel   was   inaugurated   on   September   8   1856   by Cardinal   János   Scitovszky   of   Gran,   in   the   presence   of   Ferenc   Liszt,   whose   Mass   for   Male   Voices   was   heard."   The   chapel   was   built   on   the initiative   of   the   citizens   of   Pest   in   memory   of Archduchess   Hermina,   daughter   of   the   Palatine   József,   but   the   1848   War   of   Independence   and the   ensuing   retaliations   delayed   the   building,   so   that   it   was   only   completed   by   1856.   Near   the   chapel   is   the   Ferenc   Liszt   School,   which   has   a specialized   class   for   singing   and   music.   There   the   participants   also   unveiled   a   sculpture   of   the   composer   (by   Róza   Villám).   A   tablet   on   the wall   of   the   Fót   Church   also   relates   that   Liszt   played   the   organ   there   in   1865,   and   the   Music Academy's Youth   Group   of   the   Society   also   lay   a wreath there regularly. In   1979   the   Society   ran   a   competition   in   choral   leadership   for   the   students   of   the   Ferenc   Liszt   Academy   of   Music.   In   October   1981,   they organized   along   with   the Austrian   Cultural   Institute   a   Hungarian-Austrian   Liszt   Symposium   at   the   Institute's   seat   in   Benczúr   utca,   Budapest, attended by prominent Hungarian and Austrian Liszt scholars. In   the   same   year,   the   professor   of   medicine,   Dr   Imre   Magyar,   gave   a   lecture   on   "My   Encounter   with   Liszt". The   winners   of   a   musical   contest held for medical students provided the musical accompaniment to the lecture. In   1981,   the   Budapest   Choir   and   the   Liszt   Society's   group   functioning   at   the   Ferenc   Liszt Academy   of   Music   gave   a   joint   recital,   singing   Via crucis and Liszt motets. In the same year, the society organized a Concert of Hungarian Music. In   1975,   the   Radio   broadcast   a   cultural   competition   entitled   Liszt   and   His   Time,   which   was   won   by   the   Ferenc   Liszt   group   in   Szekszárd.   In the   same   year,   Budapest   City   Council   and   the   Ferenc   Liszt   Society   invited   applications   for   a   Liszt   competition.   The   subjects   given   for studies   on   a   level   of   popular   scholarship   were   "Liszt   and   Europe",   "Liszt   and   Hungary"   and   "The   Works   of   Liszt".   The   results   were announced on September 22 1976. Lectures were given on the competition essays, and they also appeared in book form. In   1978   the   society   issued   the   first   summary   of   its   activities,   entitled   Five   Years   of   the   Ferenc   Liszt   Society.   The   report   was   sent   out   to   all members. In   1982   the   first   volume   of   the   Little   Liszt   Library   was   published,   the   aim   being   to   make   available   the   lectures   given   at   the   society's   various events.   The   Presidium   considered   it   necessary   to   make   "these   valuable   lectures   in   some   of   which   scholars   have   revealed   data   and   details of   Ferenc   Liszt's   life   which   were   previously   unpublished",   available   as   widely   as   possible.   Unfortunately   only   lectures   read   from   written versions could be published, and these are far fewer than the total number delivered. The   second   volume   in   the   Little   Library   appeared   in   1984,   and   the   third   in   1990   The   society   intends   to   carry   on   with   the   series   as   soon   as financial conditions permit. In   1986,   which   was   the   175th   anniversary   of   Liszt's   birth   and   the   centenary   of   his   death,   the   society   published   a   second   report   on   its activities, entitled Jubilee Year... It   is   also   laid   down   in   the   statutes   that   the   society   should   "establish   relations   with   Liszt   societies   and   other   associations   and   institutions   with similar objective abroad".
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